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09/Aug/2018

Do you give your kids probiotics?

Every year it seems like the back to school commercials start to pop up earlier and

earlier in the summer months. Although these commercials are aimed at bringing

parents into office supply and clothing stores in prep for their kids returning to

school, as parents we can also use this time to implement nutritional strategies to

help our kids excel during the school year.

Besides the obvious beneficial lifestyle approaches like eating a balanced nutrient

rich diet and daily exercise, there are a few specific recommendations that may help

your kids have the edge when it comes to starting school.

Probiotics Kids Back to School

[banner ]Probiotics[/banner]

Probiotics are live bacteria cultures that seem to have varying health benefits when

introduced into our gastrointestinal tract. Probiotics are naturally found in many

fermented foods such as yogurt, kefir, miso, tempeh, sauerkraut and kombucha. It is

believed that as a species, fermented foods played a larger role in our diet as we

evolved and our bodies have grown to rely on these bacterial cultures for optimal

health and wellbeing. Our modern “western” diet has been relatively low in these

fermented foods and there have been hypothesis relating many chronic diseases of

the gastrointestinal tract and immune system back to imbalanced gut bacteria.

Subsequently we have witnessed a surge in probiotics being offered in supplemental

form as a way to help restore this balance. It is important that I stress the fact that

probiotics alone are not the complete picture with regard to a healthy

gastrointestinal and immune system but research has suggested that they do play a

part.

 

Probiotics help boost the immune system – with kids heading back indoors and

spending large amounts of time in classrooms with each other (including daycare),

there is a dramatic increase in germ exposure and potential for kids to fall prey to

illness. In one study, 326 children aged 3-5 years were randomly assigned to

receive, in double-blind fashion, probiotic supplementation. Treatments were given

twice per day in divided doses for 6 months, including the winter season. Compared

with placebo, the probiotic group had the following results; fever reduction 53-73%,

cough reduction 41-62%, decreased runny nose 28-59%, decreased need for

antibiotics 68-82%, reduced absence from school 28-32%.

 

Probiotics help with allergies – Heading back indoors can trigger many kids who

are especially allergic to dusts and molds. With regard to asthmatic children with

allergic rhinitis, studies have shown the use of probiotics resulted in a significant

reduction in the inflammatory immune chemistry produced by peripheral blood

mononuclear cells. Further studies have shown specific down-regulation of T cells

(immune cells), which beneficially alter the balance of pollen specific antibodies in

seasonal allergic rhinitis. In short – probiotics lower the allergic load and decrease

inflammation.

 

Probiotics help with mood – Recent research is showing new gut-brain

connections as happy gut ecology seems to make for happier brains. In one

particular study, anxious mice dosed with probiotics showed lower levels of anxiety,

decreased stress hormones, and even increased brain receptors for

neurotransmitters vital in curbing worry, anxiety and fear. With better mood comes

greater ease and ability to learn in school settings and beyond.

Stay tuned for part 2 which will focus on cold/flu prevention and treatment.

Book a consultation with our Naturopathic Doctor Shawn Meirovici for

more information on child-friendly probiotic strains and dosages.

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Leyer, GJ et al. Probiotic effects on cold and influenza-like symptom incidence

and duration in children. Pediatrics 2009; 124-179.

Walker, WA. Mechanisms of action of probiotics. Clin Infect Dis. 2008; 46 (Suppl

2): S87-91.

Yang, G et al. Treatment of Allergic Rhinitis with Probiotics: An alternative

approach. N Am J Med Sci. Aug 2013; 5 (8): 465-68.

Javier, AB, Forsytthe, P & Cryan, J. Ingestion of Lactobacillus strain regulates

emotional behavior and central GABA receptor expression in mice via the vagus

nerve. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA. Sep 20, 2011; 108(38): 16050-55.


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21/Jul/2018

It’s the summer of 2018 and it’s a hot one. Having fun in the sun is what we dream about all winter long and while we do benefit from some sun exposure (boosting levels of vitamin D and serotonin) we must also balance sun exposure with sun protection. In this article I will outline some general guidelines with reference to safe sun exposure, getting enough vitamin D and how consuming certain foods may help further protect us during recommended exposure times.

Exposure

According to recent research we now know that vitamin D is not only important for strong healthy bones but also plays a role in preventing some chronic diseases like Multiple Sclerosis and Cancer. So we need to know some general guidelines for getting the right amount of sun exposure while helping protect ourselves from damaging UV radiation.

In 2001 the Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency set out to determine daily UV radiation levels in major cities across Australia. How much sun was needed to produce adequate levels of vitamin D and how much exposure could produce damage to the skin was investigated. The general guidelines to come out of the report were as follows: In the peak of the summer, July and August in North America, “2 to 14 minutes of sun three to four times per week at midday will give fair-skinned people with 15 per cent of the body exposed the recommended amount of Vitamin D. However, redness (skin damage) can occur in only eight minutes in these conditions.

So in peak summer times from 10 am to 3pm, you should use protection against the sun; shade, hats, clothing, sunglasses and sunscreen.

But earlier in the day and later in the afternoon, for a similar period of sun exposure and vitamin D manufacture, you get much less skin damage.”(http://www.abc.net.au/health/thepulse/stories/2006/04/05/1609208.htm)

For the months just before and after the peak summer months (June and September) the study revealed that the time of sun exposure needed for adequate vitamin D levels increases to 10 to 15 minutes 3-4 times per week. In the fall, winter and early spring months we need short periods of exposure during peak times of the day 10am-3pm in order to make enough vitamin D.

Sun-Blocking Foods

The question then becomes; in those times of recommended sun exposure how do we further protect ourselves from the damage of UV radiation? Part of the answer may be in the food we eat and beverages we drink. UV radiation helps us to make important compounds such as vitamin D but it can also cause damage to our cells. Cellular damage occurs via the production of inflammation and damaging compounds called free radicals. Some important compounds in our diet that combat inflammation and free radicals are: Omega-3 fatty acids and Antioxidants.

Antioxidants are compounds found in fruits and vegetables that serve to protect the plant against the harmful effects of its environment, including UV radiation. Many of these antioxidants incur the vibrant colors we associate with fruits and vegetables onto them.

Lycopene is a powerful antioxidant found in red colored fruits and vegetables such as: Tomatoes, Watermelon, Guava, Grapefruit, Papaya and Red Peppers including Chili Pepper. Lycopene is most easily absorbed when it has been cooked, making tomato paste and cooked tomatoes an excellent source of bio-available lycopene. Not only does this antioxidant protect the fruit/vegetable from UV damage, when we consume lycopene, it protects our body as well.

Anthocyanidins are a group of antioxidants that incur free radical protection and have a dark red or purplish color. Rich sources of anthocyanidins include: Blueberries, Acai, Pomegranate, Blackberries and Cherries.

The flavonoid antioxidants in green tea include the very powerful polyphenol EGCG. EGCG has not only been shown to inhibit tumor cells in some cancers but has also been shown to protect cells from the aging effects of UV radiation. Particularly matcha green tea (pulverized powdered tea leaves) can be 137 percent higher in EGCG than regular water infused tea leaf. Dark chocolate is also very high in phenols and can incur a 25 percent increase in sun tolerance at 2 ounces of over 70% cacao per day.

Another compound important for protecting our body against the potentially harmful effects of sun exposure are omega-3 fatty acids. These fatty acids help to drive an anti-inflammatory pathway in the body. Radiation and chronic disease induces inflammation which can lead to cellular damage and premature aging. Fish is an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, particularly Salmon, Herring, Mackerel, Trout and Sardines. It is recommended to eat at least 2 servings of high omega-3 fish per week or to take a fish oil supplement daily.

Another good source of omega-3 fatty acids are flaxseeds. Flaxseeds also contain compounds called lignans which may protect against the development of some cancers. It is recommended to have a half teaspoon of ground flaxseeds per day or a flaxseed oil supplement.

Although these are all specific examples of foods rich in sun protecting compounds, a good general rule of thumb is too eat plenty of vibrantly colored fruits and vegetables which will undoubtedly be rich in antioxidants. It is also just as important to limit foods which can cause free radical damage and inflammation, these include: sugar and red meats.

Equip your body with sun protecting foods and follow the guidelines as to when to allow for uninhibited sun exposure. By doing so you will make the D and be problem free.

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dr_shawn

Patient focused integrative health care. Utilizing effective natural approaches designed to be used alone or to compliment conventional medical care.


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