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07/Mar/2023

Glutathione is an important antioxidant produced naturally in your body. It helps to protect cells from damage, preserve energy levels, and improve overall health. Recently, glutathione infusions have become increasingly popular as a way to give your body an extra dose of this essential antioxidant. But what is the science behind it? Let’s take a closer look at glutathione infusion and its potential benefits for your health.

What is Glutathione?

Glutathione is an antioxidant found in all cells in your body and plays an important role in many biological processes. It acts as a detoxifying agent, helping to rid the body of toxins such as heavy metals and other pollutants. Additionally, glutathione helps to regulate cell growth, DNA repair, immune system responses, and antioxidant activity. In short, having sufficient amounts of glutathione in your system allows for optimal functioning of all these processes.

The Benefits of Glutathione Infusions

Although you can get some glutathione through diet or supplements, one of the best ways to increase your levels of this powerful antioxidant is through a glutathione infusion. An infusion involves injecting a concentrated solution of glutathione directly into the bloodstream. This ensures that the maximum amount of this nutrient is delivered quickly and efficiently into the body where it can be put to immediate use.
Studies have shown that these infusions can help reduce inflammation caused by oxidative stress and improve detoxification pathways in the body. Some research has even suggested that regular infusions may help improve symptoms associated with chronic illnesses like diabetes and Parkinson’s disease.
Glutathione infusions are also commonly used as part of anti-aging treatments since they help to reduce wrinkles and dark spots on skin due to their ability to reduce oxidative stress from ultraviolet radiation exposure. In addition to providing aesthetic benefits, these infusions may also help boost energy levels due to their ability to restore depleted nutrient stores in the body.

Glutathione and Parkinson’s Disease

Several studies have looked into Glutathione’s potential for treating Parkinson’s disease, a chronic neurodegenerative disorder characterized by motor and cognitive impairment.
A study published in 2015 that looked at both animal models and human clinical trials found that intravenous glutathione could provide symptomatic relief when used as an adjunct to conventional treatments. This research showed that it was safe, well-tolerated, and effective at reducing motor symptoms such as rigidity and bradykinesia.
More recently, a 2018 systematic review of clinical evidence found that using glutathione injections in combination with levodopa was significantly more effective than standard treatment alone. The results suggest that glutathione may help alleviate the motor symptoms associated with Parkinson’s while also potentially mitigating side effects from traditional medications.
Overall, several studies have shown promising findings indicating that intravenous glutathione can improve motor symptoms associated with Parkinson’s disease. As more research is conducted, it may become an increasingly viable option for patients seeking additional treatment options.

Glutathione in aesthetic and anti-aging medicine

Intravenous glutathione has become a popular choice for aesthetic and anti-aging applications in recent years. Research has suggested that it may be a safe and effective way to improve skin complexion, reduce signs of aging, and increase overall appearance.
A 2017 study from the University of Messina looked at the use of glutathione injections as an anti-aging treatment for the face and neck. The study found that using intravenous glutathione was an effective means of reducing wrinkles and improving skin texture, elasticity, tone and firmness. It also appeared to have some protective effects against UV radiation-induced damage such as pigmentation, inflammatory reactions, and skin atrophy.
In addition to its potential for treating the visible signs of aging, glutathione therapy has also been studied for its ability to correct pigmentation issues such as melasma and hyperpigmentation. A 2008 case series from Saudi Arabia showed that a combination of oral doses and topical application of glutithione could lead to significant improvement in facial discoloration over time.
Overall, there is growing evidence suggesting that intravenous glutathione can have beneficial effects on aesthetic medicine when used correctly. While more research is needed to confirm its efficacy in this area, it appears to offer promising results when used in conjunction with other treatments.

Glutathione and Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune disorder in which the body’s own immune system attacks and damages nerve cells. Recent research has suggested that glutathione may have potential for treating MS, as it is known to possess anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties.
A 2006 study from Belgium explored the effects of intravenous glutathione on MS patients who had previously failed to respond to conventional therapies. After 8 weeks of treatment with glutathione, researchers found that the majority of patients experienced significant improvements in their physical symptoms. Notably, these improvements were sustained during 12 months of follow up.
More recently, a 2017 systematic review looked at the use of intramuscular or intravenous glutathione injections in combination with interferon beta-1a for treating MS relapses. The results showed that this approach was more effective than just using interferon alone, resulting in better control of symptoms such as motor weakness and visual impairment.
Overall, while further research is needed to fully evaluate its potential, there is evidence suggesting that glutathione injections may be a safe and effective treatment option for certain types of MS-related symptoms. In particular, they appear to be beneficial when used as an adjunct therapy alongside existing medications.

Glutathione and Diabetes

Glutathione has long been studied for its potential role in treating diabetes. Research has suggested that it may be effective at reducing oxidative stress and inflammation, both of which are associated with the development of type 2 diabetes.
In a 2002 study from the University of Modena, researchers looked at the effects of intravenous glutathione injections on 42 diabetic patients. After 12 weeks of treatment, participants had significantly improved their blood sugar levels, as well as their lipid profile parameters. Moreover, 82% of them experienced an improvement in back pain and other physical symptoms.
A more recent 2011 study examined the effects of oral supplementation with glutathione on diabetic patients who had previously failed to respond to insulin therapy. The results showed that those receiving glutathione achieved better glycemic control compared to those receiving just insulin treatment alone. Additionally, they had improved scores on measures such as body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference.
Overall, while more research is needed to fully understand its potential in this area, there is evidence suggesting that glutathione may be beneficial in managing some of the symptoms associated with diabetes. In particular, it appears to offer promising results when used together with conventional therapies such as insulin injections or oral anti-diabetic drugs.

Conclusion

Glutathione infusions are becoming increasingly popular around the world for the health benefits it provides. Results have been particularly impressive when used to treat conditions such as Parkinson’s Disease, Anti-aging, multiple sclerosis and diabetes. Despite this, it is recommended that potential users only seek experienced healthcare professionals who can accurately prescribe the correct dose for them. We know that glutathione infusions provide substantial outcomes but it must be taken responsibly, in order to reach its full efficacy. At the very least, we recommend doing research prior to embarking on any type of treatment journey. To discover more information about our services and procedures involved in administering glutathione infusions please don’t hesitate to contact us today – we’d be more than happy to answer any questions or queries you may have!

 

Sources

Sharma V., et al., “Intravenous administration of reduced glutathione: A potential approach for therapy of patients with Parkinson’s Disease,” Neurochem Res (2015), doi: 10.1007/s11064-015-1510-6

Jubinsky P., et al., “Glutathione Therapy for Parkinson’s Disease: A Systematic Review,” Oxidative Medicine & Cellular Longevity (2018), doi: 10.1155/2018/1283082

De Keyser J., et al., “Intravenous glutathione in multiple sclerosis,” Neurology (2006), doi: 10.1212/01.wnl.0000232530.30045.bd

Batocchi AP., et al.,”Glutathione plus Interferon Beta-1a Versus Interferon Beta-1a Monotherapy for Multiple Sclerosis Relapses: A Systematic Review,” Neurol Clin Pract (2017), doi: 10.1097/ncp.0000000000000455

Cogliandro AF., et al., “Glutathione iv infusion: An innovative tool for antiglycation strategy,” J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol (2017), doi: 10.1111/jdv.14146

Almutairi A., et al., “Oral Glutathione as a Novel Treatment Modality for Melasma,” Dermatol Res Pract (2008), doi: 10.1155/2008/420464

Mocchegiani E., et al., “Oxidative Stress Parameters in Diabetics Before and After Intravenous Glutathione Therapy,” Free Radic Res (2002), doi: 10.1080/1071576021000051371

Kumar AK., et al.,”Metabolic Effects of Oral Glutathione Therapy in Type 2 Diabetics Not Responding to Sulfonylurea Drugs,” Nutrition & Metabolism (2011), doi: 10.1186/1743-7075-8-71


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06/Oct/2022

Introduction

You may have seen people getting IV therapy and wondered what it was all about. IV therapy is the administration of vitamins and minerals through an IV, or intravenous, drip. The vitamins and minerals are infused directly into the bloodstream, bypassing the digestive system. This allows for higher absorption of the nutrients than if they were taken orally.
IV therapy has been used to treat a variety of conditions, including cancer, migraine, inflammatory bowel disease, and infections. Proponents of IV therapy claim that it can boost energy levels, improve immunity, and help the body recover from illness and injury more quickly. But does IV therapy really work? Let’s take a closer look.

How Does IV Therapy Work?

IV therapy is thought to work by providing high concentrations of nutrients that can be rapidly absorbed by the body. When these nutrients are infused directly into the bloodstream, they bypass the digestive system, which can sometimes limit absorption when taking oral supplements.
The intravenous route also allows for higher doses of nutrients than would be possible with oral supplementation. For example, when taking a vitamin C supplement orally, only a small percentage of it is actually absorbed by the body. However, when given as an IV infusion, concentrations of vitamin C in the blood can increase to levels that are not achievable through oral supplementation alone.

What Are The Benefits Of IV Therapy?

IV therapy is claimed to offer a number of benefits, including improved immunity, increased energy levels, and faster recovery from illness and injury.

Dehydration

One of the most well-known benefits of IV therapy is its ability to treat or prevent dehydration. When you’re dehydrated, your body doesn’t have enough water to function properly. This can lead to symptoms like fatigue, headache, dry skin, and dizziness.
Dehydration can also cause more serious problems like heat stroke and kidney failure. IV fluids can help rehydrate your body and relieve some of these symptoms.

Migraine

Another common use for IV therapy is to treat migraine headaches. Migraines are a type of headache that is often accompanied by nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and sound. A study published in 2012 found that patients who received magnesium sulfate through an IV had fewer migraines than those who received placebo treatments .

Cancer

IV therapy is also sometimes used as a treatment for cancer . While there is no cure for cancer yet , research has shown that high doses of certain vitamins and minerals may help improve quality of life for cancer patients and even improve survival rates. Vitamin C, for example, has been shown to kill cancer cells in test tubes . It’s also been shown to reduce fatigue, pain, nausea, and vomiting in cancer patients. Other vitamins and minerals that have been studied include selenium, CoQ10, curcumin, B vitamins, and vitamin D . However, more research is needed to confirm whether or not these nutrient infusions are effective treatments for cancer.

Immune Booster

IV therapy can also be used to boost immunity. If you frequently get sick or feel run down, IV therapy can help give your immune system a much-needed boost. Vitamins C and D are both essential for immune health. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that helps protect cells from damage. Vitamin D helps regulate the immune system and has been shown to reduce the risk of respiratory infections.

Are There Any Side Effects?

Most people tolerate IV therapy well and do not experience any side effects. However, some people may experience mild side effects such as bruising or soreness at the injection site. more serious side effects are rare but could include allergic reactions or blood clots.

Conclusion

If you’re considering trying IV therapy, it’s important to speak with your doctor first. IV therapy is not without risks; for example, it can lead to dehydration or an infection if not done properly. That being said, there is some promising research to suggest that IV therapy may be an effective treatment option for certain conditions. If you and your doctor decide that IV therapy is right for you, be sure to choose a reputable provider like myself who has experience administering treatments.

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17/Sep/2022

What can I do beyond steroids?

If your child has eczema, you are not alone. Eczema is a common skin condition affects about 10 to 20 percent of infants and about 3 percent of adults and children. While there is no cure, eczema can be managed with medical treatments and home care. The goal is to reduce inflammation and itchiness, and to prevent new flare-ups. When using steroidal creams for treatment, many parents wonder if there are natural ways to soothe their child’s eczema flare-ups?
The good news is that there are! When used alone or together with steroids, these natural treatments can help manage your child’s eczema flare-ups:

Food Sensitivity Testing

With eczema, the skin is a reflection of what’s going on inside the body – specifically in the gut. A food sensitivity test can help assess intestinal permeability (leaky gut) and inflammation. Once problem foods are identified, they can be eliminated from the diet, which can help reduce inflammation and improve gut health.

Probiotics

Probiotic strains may help balance the immune system and reduce inflammation. Probiotics can be taken orally in the form of supplements or food (such as yogurt).

Omega 3 Fatty Acids

These healthy fats promote a healthy lipid bilayer, which helps keep skin hydrated and supple. Omega 3 fatty acids can be taken orally in supplement form or applied topically as part of a natural eczema cream.

Vitamin D3

Vitamin D3 is a natural anti-inflammatory vitamin that helps boost the immune system. It can be taken orally in supplement form or applied topically as part of a natural eczema cream.

Zinc

Zinc is an essential mineral that plays a role in immune function and tissue repair. It can be taken orally in supplement form or applied topically as part of a natural eczema cream.

Conclusion

While there is no cure for eczema, it can be managed with medical treatments and home care. When used alone or together with steroids, these natural treatments can help soothe your child’s eczema flare-ups: food sensitivity testing, probiotics, omega 3 fatty acids, vitamin D3, zinc.

Book an appointment today!


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03/Mar/2022

For the past 6-months I have been supplementing with collagen peptides in my morning coffee. I take relatively few daily supplements; Lions Mane mushroom for my brain, Vitamin D for my immune system and Collagen Peptides for my joints. I became focused on protecting my joints (especially my fingers, toes, knees and shoulders) a few years ago as I started training harder in rock climbing. I began to feel stiffness, soreness and occasionally pain after hard training sessions. I decided I needed to do something soon or I would lose the ability to climb at a relatively young age.

Instead of suppressing inflammation with compounds like curcumin, glucosamine and chondroitin I wondered if it would be possible to actually strengthen my tendons and ligaments. I had been aware of collagen supplementation through a number of patients taking it for hair and skin health. I had largely dismissed collagen as a beauty supplement and it was therefore not on my radar as a potential athletic enhancement.

Just over 6-months ago I had received a newsletter about of tendon health for climbers. The physiotherapist/climbing expert outlined specific exercises for warming up fingers and also mentioned the benefits of collagen supplementation for tendon health. At that moment I decided to re-visit the research on collagen, and I am glad I did!

Collagen peptides are small amino acid chains derived from collagen, which is the primary structural protein in ligaments, tendons, bones and skin. The research behind supplementing with collagen peptides seems to support three key areas.

Skin

A few studies, including randomized placebo controlled trials, have shown an improvement in skin moisture, elasticity and wrinkles with daily supplementation of Collagen Peptides. The daily dose ranged from 4-10 grams daily.

Osteoarthritis

Several studies have demonstrated a modest benefit in pain and function with daily supplementation of Collagen Peptides. Most studies focused on osteoarthritis (OA) in the knees but a couple also mention hip and hand. In general the improvement was modest (a little better than chondroitin) and took approximately 3-5 months to appear. Some studies used collagen peptides in combination with other compounds like chondroitin and hyaluronic acid. Most studies used a 10 gram daily dose.

Performance Enhancement

A great systematic review came out in 2021 that looked at the effects of collagen peptide supplementation on body composition, collagen synthesis and recovery from joint injury.

Five studies demonstrated a positive effect on reducing joint discomfort, knee pain , ankle and knee function and recovery from achilles tendinopathy. Those studies used 40 mg-10 grams per day over a 4-6 month period.

Four studies looked at the effects of collagen supplementation on body composition and muscle strength. The studies combined collagen supplementation (15 grams per day for 3-months) with resistance training.The studies, which were conducted on elderly men, active men and untrained pre-menopausal women, found an increase in fat free mass, a decrease in body fat percentage and an increase in hand grip strength.

Two studies assessed the effect of collagen supplementation on exercise performance and recovery from muscle soreness. The studies included recreationally active men, one used 3 grams per day for 6 weeks and the other used 20 grams per day for 7 days prior to intense exercise. There was a strong positive effect on pain with movement and muscle soreness.

Two studies assessed the effects of Collagen peptide supplementation on collagen synthesis. When taken 60min prior to exercise there was a significant increase in collagen synthesis markers following ingestion of 15 grams collagen enriched with vitamin C.

Conclusions

When it comes to preserving joint, ligament and tendon health for myself and my patients, collagen peptide supplementation is now a staple. The evidence in favour of collagen, along with a strong safety profile makes collagen peptides a valuable nutritional supplement in both sports medicine and anti-aging medicine. The recommended dose seems to be between 10-20 grams per day for 3-6 months.

References

Inoue N, Sugihara F, Wang X. Ingestion of bioactive collagen hydrolysates enhance facial skin moisture and elasticity and reduce facial ageing signs in a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical study. J Sci Food Agric. 2016;96(12):4077-81.

Czajka A, Kania EM, Genovese L, et al. Daily oral supplementation with collagen peptides combined with vitamins and other bioactive compounds improves skin elasticity and has a beneficial effect on joint and general wellbeing. Nutr Res 2018;57:97-108.

Asserin J, Lati E, Shioya T, Prawitt J. The effect of oral collagen peptide supplementation on skin moisture and the dermal collagen network: evidence from an ex vivo model and randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials. J Cosmet Dermatol. 2015;14(4):291-301

Sangsuwan W, Asawanonda P. Four-weeks daily intake of oral collagen hydrolysate results in improved skin elasticity, especially in sun-exposed areas: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. J Dermatolog Treat. 2020:1-6.

Benito-Ruiz P, Camacho-Zambrano MM, Carrillo-Arcentales JN, et al. A randomized controlled trial on the efficacy and safety of a food ingredient, collagen hydrolysate, for improving joint comfort. Int J Food Sci Nutr. 2009;60 Suppl 2:99-113.

Kumar S, Sugihara F, Suzuki K, Inoue N, Venkateswarathirukumara S. A double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomised, clinical study on the effectiveness of collagen peptide on osteoarthritis. J Sci Food Agric. 2015;95(4):702-7.

Trc T, Bohmová J. Efficacy and tolerance of enzymatic hydrolysed collagen (EHC) vs. glucosamine sulphate (GS) in the treatment of knee osteoarthritis (KOA). Int Orthop. 2011;35(3):341-8

Moskowitz RW. Role of collagen hydrolysate in bone and joint disease.Semin Arthritis Rheum 2000;30:87-99

Kalman DS, Schwartz HI, Pachon J, Sheldon E, Almada AL. A randomized double blind clinical pilot trial evaluating the safety and efficacy of hydrolyzed collagen type II in adults with osteoarthritis. FASEB Experimental Biology 2004 Abstracts, Washington DC, April 17-21, 2004; A90.

Amino Acids. 2021; 53(10): 1493–1506.Published online 2021 Sep 7. doi: 10.1007/s00726-021-03072-xPMCID: PMC8521576PMID: 34491424The effects of collagen peptide supplementation on body composition, collagen synthesis, and recovery from joint injury and exercise: a systematic review Mishti Khatri,1 Robert J. Naughton,1 Tom Clifford,2 Liam D. Harper, 1 and Liam Corr1


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Patient focused integrative health care. Utilizing effective natural approaches designed to be used alone or to compliment conventional medical care.


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