Is-PEA-the-new-CBD.jpg
21/Nov/2019

It was my hope to find an effective alternative to Cannabidiol (CBD) that wouldn’t land me in jail when I travel; so is PEA the new CBD?

PEA stands for Palmitoylethanolamide. It is a fatty acid that is found in Eggs, Cheese, Meats and Peanuts.  We also make PEA during stress, infections, inflammation, trauma, allergies, pain, cardiac disease, kidney disease and obesity. Much like our endocannabinoids, PEA is responsible for maintaining cellular homeostasis.

Naturopathic Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis

How does it work?

While PEA does not have a direct effect on Cannabinoid receptor (CB1 and CB2) it does have similar mechanisms of action to our endocannabinoids and cannabidiol (CBD). PEA looks very similar to our body’s own endocannabinoids (AEA and 2-AG). These similarities allow PEA to exert effects similar to our AEA and 2-AG.

PEA down regulates mast cells, which are responsible for the release of histamine and other inflammatory mediators. PEA can therefore be a powerful molecule for immune heath, inflammation, pain, neuro-protection and allergies. PEA has direct action on receptors GPCR55 and GPR119, which produce effects similar to activation of CB1 and CB2 by endocannabinoids, THC and CBD.  PEA also acts similarly to CBD by affecting the breakdown of endocannabinoids via inhibition of the enzymes FAAH and MAGL. 

Pain Management
Micronutrient Infusion

The Research

Several studies have shown that when PEA is used with opioid type drugs for low back pain, the dose of the opioids could be reduced significantly. PEA was found to exert pain relief animal models of inflammation and neuropathic pain. These analgesic effects are thought to be due to increasing endocannabinoid levels similarly to how CBD works. All in all many studies have revealed that PEA exerts similar effects to CBD.  So I thought I would give this supplement a whirl, as a alternative to CBD (especially for travel) would be an important option for patients using CBD. 

My 5-day Trial with PEA

I took the supplement P.E.A. Activate from AOR , which contains 600mg PEA per lozenge.  My daily dose was two lozenges per day and I did that for 5 days. I noticed a strange light-headed feeling about 5 minutes after chewing my first lozenge. The feeling lasted for a bout 30min. I was excited that I actually felt a bit different after that fist dose by unfortunately each dose produced a similar effect (a light relaxing feeling) that only lasted between 30-60min. There didn’t seem to be much carry over from one dose to another. The effects were always pretty fast acting but short-lived. Furthermore I had a return of some muscle soreness that was absent for most of the time that I was taking my CBD supplement.  So, it seemed like, for me, the PEA was not having the same effect that I had experienced while on CBD.

In summary, the effects that I experienced during my PEA trial were fast acting but short-lived. PEA may therefore be a useful tool for acute episodes of anxiety, pain etc… but it did not have the same accumulative and long term effects that I experienced with CBD. The research on PEA is compelling and it is possible that this supplement warrants a more long-term trial. According to the research PEA seems to be a potential alternative to CBD but from my experience it falls a bit short.  Check out my video review of PEA here. 

https://youtu.be/Yfr-Ma19gGk

IMG_6194.jpg
30/Oct/2019

“Let food be thy medicine, and let medicine be thy food”; a famous quote from the Classical Grecian physician Hippocrates. Lions Mane mushrooms are a perfect embodiment of this philosophy; as delicious as it is therapeutic. 

Lions mane (Hericium Erinaceus) is a white clumpy mushroom with long dangling spines that tends to grow in late summer/early fall on hardwoods.

I was first introduced to Lion’s Mane a few years ago when I had a few patients tell me they were using an extract of the mushroom to help with memory. Supplements that enhance brain activity, AKA Nootropics, have always tweaked my interest as one of my areas of clinical focus is in neurology. At first I thought that maybe this is the newest “superfood fad” but once I began to investigate the research on this mushroom my opinion quickly changed.

It was clear that Lions Mane had some legitimate therapeutic value in inflammation, the immune system, psychiatric conditions, cognitive enhancement, diabetes, heart disease, bowel disease and cancer.

Lions Mane Mushroom
Preparing Lions Mane Mushroom in my kitchen

Inflammation and Depression

A 2012 study demonstrated that Lions Mane mushroom contains several compounds that have moderate to high levels of antioxidant capacity. This translates into an anti-inflammatory effect in the body. A 2015 study demonstrated that participants who consumed Lions Mane had less depressive symptoms and improvements in blo-markers of depression which was attributed to it’s anti-inflammatory effects.  Another study demonstrated that Lions Mane can enhance immune function possibly by reducing inflammation and oxidative stress. 

Immune 

Not only does Lions Mane help boost immune function by reducing oxidative stress, it also seems to benefit intestinal immune function. A study on mice revealed that some of the proteins in the mushroom help encourage the growth of beneficial bacteria in the gut. 

Naturopathic Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis

Memory

Cognitive enhancement is the main reason that I see people taking this mushroom. It is possible that it does have some cognitive enhancement properties but all the research so far has been done on animals. One such study found that mice given a lion’s mane supplement had better object recognition and recognition memory. Other research suggests that Lions Mane may have the potential to prevent or treat conditions of cognitive decline like Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

Heart Health

Heart Health

Research on rats has demonstrated that Lions Mane may have cholesterol lowering effects and blood pressure lowering effects. Compounds in Lions Mane may help in the production of Nitric Oxide, which helps keep blood vessels relaxed. 

Cancer

The antioxidant properties of Lions Mane may contribute to some anti-cancer effects seen in rat and in vitro studies. One in vitro study indicated that Lions Mane has activity against human leukemia cells. Another study showed that in mice, Lions Mane has activity against Liver, Colon and Gastric cancer cells. 

Diabetes

After 4 weeks of Lions Mane supplementation, rats with diabetes had lower blood sugar levels than those who did not receive the mushroom.  Diabetes can often result in life altering nerve damage. A 2015 study showed that diabetic rats given an extract of Lions Mane had reduced nerve pain and improved antioxidant activity after 6 weeks. 

Intestinal Health

Digestive Health

I previously discussed how Lions mane can have anti-inflammatory effect of the digestive tract, as well as benefitting the growth of “good” intestinal bacteria. Another study demonstrated that Lions Mane has some interesting antimicrobial effects. Notably, Lions Mane seems to inhibit the growth of H-pylori, a bacteria responsible for close to 80% of stomach ulcers.

Nerve Repair

One of the most fascinating health benefits of Lions Mane came out of a rat study. Rats with nerve damage who were given daily extracts of Lions mane had quicker nerve cell regeneration than those who did not. 

Culinary 

Up until a few weeks ago I thought Lions Mane was an exotic mushroom that was only used therapeutically as a supplement.  Recently, I found myself in a local Farmers Market and low and behold a mushroom farmer was selling fresh Lions Mane; I was amazed! I asked the farmer “how do I prepare this”? He told me to cut the mushroom in ½ inch slices and in a hot pan with butter, sear both sides. So, I bought some and followed his advice, and discovered that Lions Mane is absolutely delicious! It is now one of my favorite cooking mushrooms and I have since heard from many foodies and chefs that it is one of their favorites too. So let food be thy medicine everyone, and cook up some Lions Mane this fall!

Citations


Leonard, Jayne. “What are the benefits of lion’s mane mushrooms?.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 22 Oct. 2018. Web.
30 Oct. 2019. <https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323400.php>


Leonard, J. (2018, October 22). “What are the benefits of lion’s mane mushrooms?.” Medical News Today. Retrieved from
https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/323400.php.

Lion’s Mane Mushroom, <i>Hericium erinaceus</i> (Bull.: Fr.) Pers. Suppresses H<sub>2</sub>O<sub>2</sub>-Induced Oxidative Damage and LPS-Induced Inflammation in HT22 Hippocampal Neurons and BV2 Microglia.
Kushairi N, Phan CW, Sabaratnam V, David P, Naidu M.
Antioxidants (Basel). 2019 Aug 1;8(8). pii: E261. doi: 10.3390/antiox8080261.
PMID: 31374912 [PubMed] Free Article
Thirteen-Week Oral Toxicity Evaluation of Erinacine AEnriched Lion’s Mane Medicinal Mushroom, Hericium erinaceus (Agaricomycetes), Mycelia in Sprague-Dawley Rats.
Lee LY, Li IC, Chen WP, Tsai YT, Chen CC, Tung KC.
Int J Med Mushrooms. 2019;21(4):401-411. doi: 10.1615/IntJMedMushrooms.2019030320.
PMID: 31002635 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
In Vitro and In Vivo Inhibition of Helicobacter pylori by Ethanolic Extracts of Lion’s Mane Medicinal Mushroom, Hericium erinaceus (Agaricomycetes).
Wang G, Zhang X, Maier SE, Zhang L, Maier RJ.
Int J Med Mushrooms. 2019;21(1):1-11. doi: 10.1615/IntJMedMushrooms.2018029487.
PMID: 30806251 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Dietary Supplementation of Lion’s Mane Medicinal Mushroom, Hericium erinaceus (Agaricomycetes), and Spatial Memory in Wild-Type Mice.
Rossi P, Cesaroni V, Brandalise F, Occhinegro A, Ratto D, Perrucci F, Lanaia V, Girometta C, Orrù G, Savino E.
Int J Med Mushrooms. 2018;20(5):485-494. doi: 10.1615/IntJMedMushrooms.2018026241.
PMID: 29953363 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
A Polysaccharide Isolated from Mycelia of the Lion’s Mane Medicinal Mushroom Hericium erinaceus (Agaricomycetes) Induced Apoptosis in Precancerous Human Gastric Cells.
Wang M, Zhang Y, Xiao X, Xu D, Gao Y, Gao Q.
Int J Med Mushrooms. 2017;19(12):1053-1060. doi: 10.1615/IntJMedMushrooms.2017024975.
PMID: 29431066 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]
Anti-Inflammatory Effects of Ethanol Extract of Lion’s Mane Medicinal Mushroom, Hericium erinaceus (Agaricomycetes), in Mice with Ulcerative Colitis.
Qin M, Geng Y, Lu Z, Xu H, Shi JS, Xu X, Xu ZH.
Int J Med Mushrooms. 2016;18(3):227-34. doi: 10.1615/IntJMedMushrooms.v18.i3.50.
PMID: 27481156 [PubMed – indexed for MEDLINE]

girl-and-hookah-1390802_640.jpg
09/Oct/2019

Intro to Afghan Kush

I chose to review Pure Farms Afghan Kush because it is a best seller on the Ontario Cannabis Store and because it’s a genetically pure strain. Kush originated in Hindu Kush mountain region sandwiched between Afghanistan and Pakistan. Geographically, Afghan Kush is therefore pretty much as authentic as you can get. In fact, Pure Farms notes that this strain is the building block for many modern Kush varieties. 

Pure Farms Afghan Kush is a medium to high potency Indica. The Farm is located in British Columbia. They have been cultivating for 25 years. The cannabis is grown in a modern green house facility with natural light and modern app-based quality assurance systems. 

Cannabis Buds

Appearance

The batch that I sampled was around 18% THC (mid-high potency) but it can land anywhere between 16-22%.  When I took out my first bud I could see that it was heavily frosted with trichomes. I was also struck by the vibrant green color of the bud, which is an indication of its freshness and lack of oxidation. The texture was a bit drier than I prefer but the smoke was not harsh and very flavorful. 

Smell Test

Immediately after opening the package I took a good whiff of the buds. The aroma was pleasant with definite floral and earthy notes. I knew right away that Myrcene and Linalool would be two prominent terpenes in this strain. I was able to confirm that Linalool and Myrcene were indeed part of this varieties profile, along with Nerolidol, Caryophyllene and Limonene (OCS.ca). Linalool and Myrcene are typically associated with relaxation, so I knew, even before smoking, that this would probably be a very relaxing strain. 

Naturopathic Treatment for Multiple Sclerosis

The experience

I took 3 draws of the Afghan Kush from a joint. The effects started within 5-10 minutes and peaked around 45 minutes after smoking. The primary sensation was a nice enjoyable relaxation throughout the body and head. I would say that the body effect was not as potent as some other Indica’s that I have tried (see my review of MK Ultra). The high felt very clean and authentic, like I was transported back in time to when the first Indica strains were being cultivated. Despite the relatively high THC content there was no paranoia. I did develop a slight headache, and dizziness toward the end of the high (might have just taken a bit too much).  Initially the experience wasn’t very sedating; however, towards the end I did feel quite sleepy. Therefore I would recommend this as an evening/night strain, not ideal for daytime use. 

Final Thoughts

I recommend this strain to the cannabis connoisseur and those interested in trying something with a great deal of authenticity. I could also see this strain being helpful for tight sore muscles and issues with sleep and stress. Even if it was primarily a placebo effect, I enjoyed feeling connected to the roots of cannabis cultivation through this very authentic Indica.

https://youtu.be/zXiljCm2yoU

brothers-457237_640.jpg
06/Jul/2018

One goal of Naturopathic pediatrics is to use natural therapies to prevent and treat mild to moderate conditions, resorting to pharmaceutical and surgical interventions as secondary options or in emergency situations. The core belief in Naturopathic pediatrics is to encourage the body to heal itself. This is achieved through supporting the immune system, addressing nutritional deficiencies, promoting a healthy diet and lifestyle; including exercise, sleep and mental habits.

 

Disease as a Process

Fever is an excellent example of how a naturopathic approach may differ from a conventional approach. A fever is our natural defence mechanism against a pathogen. By raising the temperature of the body a few degrees many pathogens (viruses, bacteria) stop functioning optimally and the body activates inflammatory immune cells and enzymes to destroy the invading organism. While conventional medicine often sees disease symptoms, like a fever, as something to be suppressed, naturopathic doctors often see them as something to be promoted.

It has become commonplace to try to intervene in the disease process too swiftly, taking medications to decrease fever and inflammation prematurely. The Naturopathic Doctors role is to recognize the stages of the disease process, closely monitoring a fever, knowing when a fever should be left alone and when intervention is necessary. All the while helping the child feel better without interfering in the healing process.

There are generally 5 stages of the disease process: Incubation, Aggravation, Destruction, Abatement and Reconstruction.

Incubation is where the invading organism is accumulating in certain areas of the body. This process can take hours to days to weeks to months. The immune system reacts and either removes the organism or the organism replicates too quickly and the body moves to the next stage. It is common to not have any obvious signs of infection during this stage.

Aggravation includes the usual signs of inflammation, replication of immune cells, fever, redness, pain, malaise, loss of appetite and fatigue. These are signs that the immune system is hard at work and should be encouraged. This is where suppression commonly occurs with fever reducing medications, and anti-inflammatories, which can revert healing back to the incubation phase.

Destruction is the peak of inflammation and results in the destruction of one organism or another.

Abatement occurs when the fight is over and it’s time to clean up the debris. The immune cells, dead organisms and inflammatory fluids must be removed by the body. The fever “breaks” and sweating begins. Coughing up phlegm, runny nose, diarrhea and other discharges remove the debris from the body. In conventional medicine, cleanup is often viewed as an additional set of annoying symptoms that need to be suppressed by drugs, often impeding on the “cleanup” process.

Fever reductions after administering fever reducing medications should not be confused with abatement. The fever will often spike again. The immune system is trying to do its job but is being suppressed.

Reconstruction happens next. The body is reconstructing damaged tissue, the body is attempting to reset back to its original state.

Most pediatric infections will run their course, and the child will heal themselves. The Naturopathic Doctor watches the disease process closely, waiting to see if the body will heal or get worse requiring intervention. Besides making this decision, it is also the Naturopathic Doctors role to encourage processes like fevers, rather than suppress healing and teach parents to save fever reducing medications until necessary.

Intervention

The Naturopathic Doctor monitors the inflammatory process, only intervening to prevent a severe state of aggravation. Mild interventions such as cooling baths, friction rubs, warming socks can often lower a high fever and help the child feel better. These therapies have their limits and are not always sufficient. It is also the Naturopathic Doctors role to recognize an emergency situation that requires pharmaceutical intervention and to educate the family with regard to monitoring the disease and recognizing an emergency situation.

Safety

The first principle of Naturopathic Medicine is “primum non nocere” first, do no harm. Safety is a combination of good diagnostics, good choice of treatments, prevention, and physician intervention when necessary. The properly trained, properly regulated Naturopathic Doctor should be able to guide the family through a confusing landscape of both conventional and non-conventional medicine by knowing which “alternative” approaches are safe and effective and when referral to another integrative professional or physician will be in the best interest of the infant, child or adult.

 

Dr. Shawn is now at KidCrew Fridays from 10am-6pm



IF-268x300-1.jpg
12/Sep/2017

Intermittent fasting is a different way of thinking about eating.

I’m suggesting that the majority of people have been eating too much and too often. I’m suggesting that breakfast is not the most important meal of the day. By following a few simple guidelines my readers can  loose weight, feel great and be healthier than ever before. The guidelines are:

 

  1. “6 to 8 and feel great”
  2. “Eat what you need”
  3. “Respect your food, respect yourself”

 

6 to 8 and feel great

Everyday eat within a 6 to 8 hour time frame. If you eat breakfast at 7:00am then your last meal of the day should not be later than 3:00pm. If you eat lunch at 12:00pm then your next and last meal should be no later than 8:00pm. In the first scenario you are basically skipping dinner and in the second scenario you are skipping breakfast. Water, tea, and even coffee are allowed outside of the 6-8 hour allotted time frame as long as there is no added calories, i.e. sugar, milk and or cream. There is also no snacking outside of your 6-8 hour window.

Now let me tell you why and how intermittent fasting works. Immediately after eating, a hormone in your body called insulin rises. Insulin tells your body to burn carbohydrates (sugar) for energy and to store whatever hasn’t been used in your liver and fat cells. This process continues for approximately 4 hours after eating. After 4 hours insulin drops and your body begins to dip into stored sugar and fat reserves for energy; or in other words that’s when you start burning fat.

It’s common practice for most people to eat 3 times a day with snacks in between, this means that we almost never dip into our fat stores. Therefore you would have to do some intensive daily exercise or eat incredibly small portions to loose weight. By following the 6-8 rule; you can almost be certain that you will be burning fat for approximately 10-12 hours per day. The only thing keeping you from shedding excess pounds is by being excessive with portion size and calorie intake, which brings us to the next guideline “eat what you need”.

 

Eat what you need

This guideline basically translates to portion control. One advantage about using the 6-8 methodology is that you will start becoming more in tune with your body and more aware of hunger and satiety. It is a great feeling to eat when you are actually hungry rather than out of habit. When we experience hunger, food is digested better. Hunger causes your gastrointestinal tract to prepare for food, including ample amounts of stomach acid aiding in the proper breakdown and absorption of nutrients.

Pay close attention to the point at which you no longer feel hunger and you are adequately satiated. Do not overeat. Eat to a point that you feel satisfied but not heavy and bloated.  You may notice that portion sizes become smaller. Now, because we are eating only two meals per day, it is also important that when we eat, we eat nutritious food and a variety of foods. Which brings us to the next guideline.

Respect your food; respect yourself

This guideline is about what kind of food you eat and how you eat it. As mentioned in the previous section, since we are essentially eating only twice per day, we want to be putting high quality foods into our body. Fresh, local and organic foods are what you want to focus on. The great thing about this diet is that it there are no restrictions on foods, it’s more about quality. Try to have meals that have a good quality protein, and complex carbohydrates such as veggies and whole-grains.

While making healthy choices is very important, it is also just as important not to stress over your food. Do your best to cook healthy while acknowledging that sometimes you will find yourself eating out, ordering fast food, and having desserts. Don’t beat yourself up about the choices you make, love whatever it is your eating, own it and do your best to eat healthy most of the time. Love your food and love yourself.

 

Final Thoughts

The guidelines I have purposed, although expressed in an original way, are not new concepts. Eating within a 6-8 hour window is also known as intermittent fasting; a lifestyle and medical intervention that shown to have a multitude of health benefits including lowering blood pressure, staving off cardiovascular disease and improving longevity. Presenting these ideas in away that is easy to incorporate into a daily routine can help to improve the lives of many people. I encourage you to try it out, give it a few weeks and let me know how you feel.

Fitness trainer Mike O’Donnell (2 meal mike) does a great job of further explaining intermittent fasting and how to easily incorporate it into your daily routine. I encourage you to visit his site http://www.theiflife.com


broccoli-1322299-1598x10651-1.jpg
22/Jul/2015

Broccoli is a member of the mustard/cabbage family known as the Brassicacea. Members of this family contain a multitude of compounds that have been and are currently being studied for their health promoting and chronic disease mitigating properties. These compounds include: Diindolymethane (DIM), Sulforaphane, Isothiocyanates and Glucoraphanin. Aside from these specialized compounds, broccoli is also a good source of vitamin C, K, A and fibre.

When investigating nutritional therapy, the most relevant clinical trials are usually those done on a population of people whom are actually consuming significant quantities of the food in question.

A study done in 2008 investigating broccoli’s role in protection against prostate cancer followed a group of men who were either given 400g of broccoli or 400g of peas per week as a dietary addition for 12 months. Samples of prostatic tissue were analyzed before and after the intervention. The results indicated that the group receiving broccoli displayed significant beneficial effects with regard to signalling pathways involved in prostate cancer growth and generalized inflammation. The effects were especially significant in men possessing a gene involved in detoxification “GSTM1” which represents approximately 50% of the population. There were no significant changes in the pea group. Analysis revealed that Sulforaphane was responsible for many of the beneficial effects of broccoli consumption.

In 2003 an epidemiological study was done in Shanghai, China, which investigated the correlation between the development of breast cancer in women and consumption of Brassicacea. The participants levels of Brassicacea consumption were measured by urine output of Isothiocyanates, (compounds in Brassicacea vegetables which help induce phase 2 detoxification). Results indicated a significant reduction in breast cancer in women with high urine levels of Isothiocyanates, therefore a high level of Brassicacea consumption.

An interesting study done in 2001 examined the protective role of Brassicacea on heterocyclic aromatic amine (HAA) metabolism. HAA’s are compounds produced in grilled foods (those yummy charred lines and smoky flavours you get when BBQ’ing your favourite foods. Although tasty, HAA’s are associated with an increased risk of several types of cancer, especially colon cancer. By measuring urinary excretion of certain metabolites from HAA’s investigators were able to conclude that metabolism of HAA’s is enhanced after eating a diet rich in Brassicacea vegetables.

As testament to the power of broccoli and other Brassicacea in health promotion, chemotherapy agents (such as C-DIM’s) have been synthesized using the naturally occurring compounds in this group of vegetables.

It is important to note that prolonged heat exposure will damage the beneficial compounds in broccoli, especially Sulforaphane. Studies suggest that in order to preserve these disease fighting compounds, low heat (such as used in steaming) and short term heat exposure (less than 10 minutes) are key points to remember when preparing Broccoli. Naturally, you can eat it raw too.


shutterstock_83508859.jpg
29/Nov/2013

Garlic (Allium Sativum) is an ancient therapeutic food that has been in use since the dawn of medicine. It is mentioned in the bible and has been used by all the great forefathers of modern medicine such as: Hippocrates, Galen and Dioscorides. Garlic is mentioned several times in the Ebers Papyrus, an ancient Egyptian medical text written circa 1550 B.C. Garlic was used topically and internally to treat ailments of the respiratory tract, digestive tract and for infection. Men and women would consume large quantities of garlic to prevent illness and improve endurance. Garlic bulbs have even been found buried in the tombs of Egyptian royalty, such as King Tutankhamen. Garlic continues to be one of the most powerful remedies in the modern day alternative health care practitioner’s toolbox. Fortunately, it has worked so well for so many thousands of years that a significant amount of funding has gone into researching the particular constituents contained in Garlic that lend it its medicinal properties.

Research has shown that sulfuric compounds in garlic are effective at lowering blood pressure, lowering LDL cholesterol, exploding certain cancer cells, and killing some strains of harmful bacteria. The following is an overview of some of the most compelling research on Garlic as a medicinal supplement over the past few years.

In ancient times Garlic was viewed as a tonic of the respiratory and digestive tract, however; persuasive evidence based research demonstrates that it is also a tonic for the cardiovascular system. In 2010 a double-blinded randomized placebo-controlled trial was performed on 51 coronary heart disease patients to determine the effect of time-released garlic powder tablets on the risk of heart attack and sudden death. It was demonstrated that after 1 year on the garlic supplement, men had a 1.5-fold reduced risk for serious cardiovascular disease and women had a 1.3-fold reduction in risk. The reduced risk was extrapolated through the finding that men had on average a decrease in LDL-cholesterol by 32.9 mg/dl and women had a 27.3 mg/dl decrease on the garlic supplement.

Besides high LDL-cholesterol, another marker of risk for cardiovascular disease is hypertension. A Meta-analysis that looked at 1994 randomized placebo controlled trials using garlic preparations as intervention for hypertension found that garlic was significantly more effective than placebo. In hypertensive patients garlic preparations produced an average of an 8.4 mmHg drop in systolic blood pressure and a 7.3 mmHg drop in diastolic blood pressure. A research article published in 2007 demonstrated that the polysulfuric compounds in garlic are converted into hydrogen sulfide by red blood cells. In turn, hydrogen sulfide has the ability to relax blood vessels, therefore decreasing blood pressure.

Over the past decade there have been numerous studies looking into garlic as a potential anti-cancer medicinal food. Studies, which looked at the correlations between garlic consumption and incidence of cancer, haven’t been extremely convincing in either direction. Some correlations do exist, however, which has spawned further investigation into the anti-carcinogenic properties of Garlic. A 2009 study in the journal of Clinical Cancer Research demonstrated that one of the sulfuric compounds in garlic, diallyl trisulfide, may have a beneficial effect on prostate cancer cells. Just like some breast cancers are sensitive to estrogen, some prostate cancers are sensitive to androgens, like testosterone. Bicalutamide is a drug given to some patients with prostate cancer in order to block the effect of testosterone on cancer cells. The diallyl trisulfide found in garlic has a similar effect to this medication, causing a decrease in androgen receptor protein, leading to a decrease in prostate specific antigen levels (PSA).

One of the most fascinating articles that I came across was an article published in 2008 in the Journal of Biologics: targets and therapy. The study looked at the treatment of childhood Pre-B Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) with preparations of garlic extracts compared to common chemotherapeutic agents used in the treatment of this illness. One of the most concerning side effects in chemotherapy treatment, especially of leukemia, is a decrease in white blood cell count and therefore a susceptibility to infection. While both the chemotherapeutic drugs and the garlic extract caused a destruction of cancerous cells, only the garlic extract was reported to not have any detrimental effect on non-cancerous white blood cells. The authors also comment on the fact that garlic is known to be an effective (around 10% the effectiveness of the antibiotic vancomycin) antimicrobial agent against many hospital acquired infective organisms.

In light of the recent cholera outbreak in Haiti, I decided to include the following study published in 2009 in the journal of Bioscience, Biotechnology and Biochemistry. In this study garlic oil was studied for its diallyl sulfide content and its antimicrobial activity against V. cholerae. The in-vitro study found the oil to have bacteriocidal effect against all tested strains of V. cholerae. It was also demonstrated that the garlic oil had an inhibitory effect on the growth of V. cholerae in contaminated food. In my opinion, it wouldn’t be a bad idea for the Centre for Disease Control and Prevention to add regular consumption of garlic to its cholerae prevention protocol in Haiti.

On a final note, I came a cross an article published in 2009 in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry that confirms the notion that fresh crushed garlic has a greater therapeutic benefit than processed garlic. This is due to a higher concentration of the sulfuric compounds that have been previously mentioned in fresh garlic. Like all food, garlic is potentially aggravating for some individuals and can cause allergic reaction in individuals with an allergy to the Alliaceae family. Be diligent when consuming garlic, especially when adding garlic to the diet of children. I have used garlic in numerous home remedies for cardiovascular health, and for upper respiratory and gastrointestinal infection. The most common complaint I get is the smell. Since the unpleasant odor of garlic is actually emitted from the inside out, it is very difficult to conceal. I have heard that consuming milk with garlic is the best way to cover it up. Cooking the garlic also helps but this greatly diminishes its therapeutic benefit. I now look at this odor as the odor of a healthy heart, and most likely, the distinguished odor of Egyptian royalty.


8-beets-nutrition.jpg
29/Nov/2013

Every time I cut into a beet root, I am still surprised by the vibrant red juice that seems to bleed out onto the chopping block. It is this undeniable similarity to blood that first made beet root and beet root juice a focus of interest in traditional medicine. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) relies heavily on the use of foods and herbs to tonify organs and energy systems in the body.

In TCM, Blood and Qi are two extremely important substances working together to maintain the vitality of the human body. Blood is more “Yin” and Qi is more “Yang”. The symbol of the “Yinyang” teaches us that a perfect balance of Blood and Qi is required for optimum health. In this medical system illness often arises as a result of either Blood or Qi being deficient. A blood deficiency can arise in the heart and/or liver leading to symptoms of insomnia, anxiety, weakness, dizziness and fatigue. Interestingly these are often the same symptoms seen in individuals experiencing anemia (the “blood deficiency” of western medicine). In TCM the primary way to restore blood is through food and herbs. Beets root, perhaps due to the bloody appearance of its juice, is thought to be an excellent dietary restorer of blood. When assisted with the use of certain herbs and acupuncture points, the dietary inclusion of beets and other red pigmented fruits and vegetables is very effective in treating the TCM diagnosis of blood deficiency.

The closest connection between the TCM medicinal use of beets for blood deficiency and how this might work from a western “science based medicine” perspective is elucidated in a Hungarian 2007 research article. The article explains that biological testing of liver tissue after consumption of beet root reveals that beets are relatively rich in metal elements such as: aluminum, copper, iron, zinc and manganese. One type of anemia known as “microcytic anemia” is usually caused by iron deficiency. With beet being a relatively rich vegetable source of iron, one can hypothesize as to why this vegetable might be an effective therapy for a “blood deficiency” or anemia.

Recent scientific research has revealed many other interesting medicinal applications for beet root. Beets contain high levels of nitrates and pigment molecules that have been shown to be powerful antioxidants, cancer protective and ergogenic. In a 2009 study, male rats were treated either with 8ml/kg/day beet root juice or nothing at all for 28 days. Both groups of rats received an injection of the toxic chemicals nitrosodiethylamine and carbon tetracloride. The rats pretreated with beet root juice demonstrated less damage to fat cells in the liver, and a 3-fold increase in the activity of the antioxidant “superoxide dismutase”. The authors concluded that beet root juice may be helpful in counteracting some of the damaging effects of environmental toxins.

A large portion of the recent research on the medicinal properties of beets, has been done in Hungary. A Hungarian research article in 2010 looked at the effect of giving 20g prepared beet root per day for one month to 24 patients with hormone resistant metastatic prostate cancer, who are also receiving chemotherapy. The results indicated that there was a significant improvement in inflammatory markers, such as transmethylation, after consuming the beet root. Here, the authors conclude that moderate consumption of beets may favorably affect the life expectancy of patients with this type of prostate cancer.

Athletes are always searching for latest performance enhancing supplement. Ergogenic (performance enhancing) aids are usually taken to increase stamina, strength and recovery. One supplement known to increase stamina is sodium nitrate. Sodium nitrate has been shown to decrease the demand for oxygen by muscle cells during exercise leading to an increase in exercise duration. Beet root juice is a natural source of nitrates and therefore, there has been a handful of studies in the past few years looking into beet root juice as a potential natural alternative to sodium nitrate. In 2009 the journal of applied physiology conducted a placebo controlled, double blinded, crossover study on 8 men ages 19-38yr. The men either consumed 500ml/day of beet root juice or black currant cordial (juice) for six consecutive days and underwent a series of moderate and intense physical activity tests on the last three days. In those men consuming beet root juice, blood nitrite levels were significantly higher on days 4-6 and systolic blood pressure was reduced by approximately 10mmHg compared to placebo. During both moderate level and intense exercise, those men taking the beet root juice demonstrate a decrease in demand for oxygen and corresponding increase in time to exhaustion compared to placebo.

Beets are an amazing vegetable. Roasted, pickled, steamed or boiled; beets are a great way to add sweetness and colour into any meal. Like all the foods I discuss on this blog, beets are full of powerful medicinal properties. However, there are some things to watch out for when considering including beets into the diet. Beet root and leaves are relatively high in a substance known as oxalates. Oxalates are excreted from the body by the kidneys and into the urine. Those who have a personal history or family history of kidney stones should take caution when consuming beets in moderate to high quantities. Most kidney stones are formed out of calcium and oxalates and consistent consumption of beets can possibly contribute to the formation of a kidney stone. Boiling beets in water has been shown to remove greater than half the amount of oxalate content. Those who enjoy eating the leaves of beets (usually steamed or boiled) can consider that a 2009 study demonstrated that boiling the leaves in milk removes more oxalates than boiling in water.


dr_shawn

Patient focused integrative health care. Utilizing effective natural approaches designed to be used alone or to compliment conventional medical care.


Information

Address: 225 Duncan Mill Road 4th Floor Toronto, Ontario M3B3K9

Clinic: 416-490-8243

Fax: 416-490-9961

Mon-Sat 10am-3pm

Dr Shawn. All Rights Reserved. Developed by SEOGorillas